Kazakhstan will chemically castrate dozens of convicted paedophiles using £178 injections this year


A total of 25 convicted paedophiles are currently awaiting forced castration in Kazakhstan, the country’s government has announced.

The sex criminals are the latest to undergo a procedure which one man said left him ‘aching so badly’ he could hardly walk.

A total of 95 men are expected to be chemically castrated this year in the ex-Soviet state, at a cost of £178 per paedophile, with the crash already allocated, according to the Health Ministry.

A total of 25 convicted paedophiles are currently awaiting forced castration in Kazakhstan, the country's government has announced

A total of 25 convicted paedophiles are currently awaiting forced castration in Kazakhstan, the country’s government has announced

Convicts in Ust Kamenogorsk prison in north-eastern Kazakhstan, where chemical castrations are carried out

Convicts in Ust Kamenogorsk prison in north-eastern Kazakhstan, where chemical castrations are carried out

Convicts in Ust Kamenogorsk prison in north-eastern Kazakhstan, where chemical castrations are carried out

Interior Ministry official Alexey Milyuk said that since the 2018 law came into effect, 'the number of offences against the underaged has decreased by 15.4 per cent'

Interior Ministry official Alexey Milyuk said that since the 2018 law came into effect, 'the number of offences against the underaged has decreased by 15.4 per cent'

Interior Ministry official Alexey Milyuk said that since the 2018 law came into effect, ‘the number of offences against the underaged has decreased by 15.4 per cent’

Interior Ministry official Alexey Milyuk said that since the 2018 law came into effect, ‘the number of offences against the underaged has decreased by 15.4 per cent’.

Despite this there has been a 4.8 per cent rise in sex attacks on children, but this may be due to increased reporting of crimes, he said.

The Kazakh government believes that use of forced chemical castration to reduce male libido for life among convicted paedopohiles will ultimately slash sex crimes against children.

‘Legislation has been significantly tightened to prevent crimes against the sexual integrity of children,’ he said.

‘Early parole for paedophiles has been prohibited… Jail terms for rape and sexual violence against children have been increased from 12 years to life.’

Kazakhstan now jails all paedophiles in maximum security prisons, Milyuk said.

This year ’25 convicts sentenced to forced chemical castration by courts are now in the penitentiary system.’

One child rapist who was castrated said after undergoing the first injection to reduce his libido: ‘It is incredibly difficult, I wouldn’t wish it on my worst enemy.’

He called for a ban on the ‘barbaric’ procedure.

Nurse and grandmother Zoya Manaenko, 69, who is tasked with castrating paedophiles in one Kazakh jail, claims the West should also follow the ex-Soviet state's example

Nurse and grandmother Zoya Manaenko, 69, who is tasked with castrating paedophiles in one Kazakh jail, claims the West should also follow the ex-Soviet state's example

Nurse and grandmother Zoya Manaenko, 69, who is tasked with castrating paedophiles in one Kazakh jail, claims the West should also follow the ex-Soviet state’s example

Zoya insists it is right that child sex attackers should face this ultimate punishment

Zoya insists it is right that child sex attackers should face this ultimate punishment

Zoya insists it is right that child sex attackers should face this ultimate punishment

But a nurse and grandmother tasked with castrating paedophiles in one Kazakh jail claims the West should also follow the ex-Soviet state’s example.

Zoya Manaenko, 69, insists it is right that child sex attackers should face this ultimate punishment.

‘These people need to be stopped somehow,’ said Zoya who works in a prison hospital.

‘They commit terrible crimes against children. So it is right that the law allows this.’

Zoya administers injections that one man said left him 'aching so badly' he could hardly walk

Zoya administers injections that one man said left him 'aching so badly' he could hardly walk

Zoya administers injections that one man said left him ‘aching so badly’ he could hardly walk

Kazakhstan’s no tolerance policy includes publishing pictures, names and addresses of all child sex attackers after their release from jail.

Last year a map showed the location of 234 ‘potentially dangerous paedophiles’ after their release.

Among those on the list of shame was Turegaz Tekebayev, 34, who had molested a five year old.

Another was Igor Trusov, 60, who sexually abused an eight year old, and was released in 2018 after a seven year sentence.

Timur Musin, 32, served a dozen years in jail, for abusing a two year old, according to the blacklist.

Kazakhstan's no tolerance policy includes publishing pictures, names and addresses of all child sex attackers after their release from jail. Last year the map (pictured) showed the location of 234 'potentially dangerous paedophiles' after their release

Kazakhstan's no tolerance policy includes publishing pictures, names and addresses of all child sex attackers after their release from jail. Last year the map (pictured) showed the location of 234 'potentially dangerous paedophiles' after their release

Kazakhstan’s no tolerance policy includes publishing pictures, names and addresses of all child sex attackers after their release from jail. Last year the map (pictured) showed the location of 234 ‘potentially dangerous paedophiles’ after their release

Lawyer Rena Kerimova said of naming and shaming: ‘These people have children, families, grandchildren and now they are in this database.

‘I believe it is a complex subject, it should have been thought through.

‘People who are not repeat offenders should not have been included in the database.’

Lawyer Rena Kerimova said naming and shaming was not necessarily a good policy, despite aiming to prevent repeat offences

Lawyer Rena Kerimova said naming and shaming was not necessarily a good policy, despite aiming to prevent repeat offences

Lawyer Rena Kerimova said naming and shaming was not necessarily a good policy, despite aiming to prevent repeat offences



Source link

Spread the love

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

GIPHY App Key not set. Please check settings

What do you think?

Then and now: Rising temperatures threaten corals

Mounted police TRAMPLE people before turning water cannons on others